Thomas Rössig, Senior Gaming Executive Appointed Head of Europe – European Gaming Industry News

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  • The number of download purchases increases to 59%
  • Almost all purchased PC games are purchased as downloads
  • Nearly two-thirds of all video game console games are purchased on physical media

After a strong increase in the first Covid-19 year 2020, the share of games purchased as downloads stabilized in 2021: the share of all PC and console games sold in Germany that were purchased as downloads did not increased by only one percentage point over the previous year, to 59%. This means that about six out of ten computer and video games were purchased again for download last year. These are the figures released today by game – the German games industry association, based on data collected by market research firm GfK. There were major differences in the share of downloads for different platforms and price categories, with downloaded games accounting for a particularly large percentage of the cheapest titles. About eight out of ten games whose price is less than 30 euros were purchased for download. The most expensive titles were more likely to have been purchased on physical media, with gamers purchasing 68% of all games costing more than €30 on data media from online stores or physical stores in 2021.

PC game players in particular relied on downloads, for example from portals like Origin and Steam. As a result, downloads accounted for around 93% of PC game sales. Almost two-thirds (64%) of all games for video game consoles such as Nintendo Switch, PlayStation and Xbox, on the other hand, were purchased on physical media.

“Thanks to their excellent accessibility, download purchases have established themselves as the preferred choice for many gamers. Even so, there are still big differences between different game platforms. Download purchases can be an attractive option for PC game players, for example, due to online discounts or the wide range of games freelancers offered. Console fans, on the other hand, like to buy games on physical media, whether to add to the collection of games on their shelves or to get limited-edition game boxes containing special fan items,” says Felix. Falcon, Managing Director. of game.

Another year of strong growth for the German games market

After a historic performance in 2020 with a growth of 32%, turnover in the German games market continued to increase significantly in 2021 with a total of around 9.8 billion euros in turnover. business generated from games, gaming hardware and fees for online gaming services – an increase of 17% over the previous year. Revenue from computer and video games increased by 19% to approximately 5.4 billion euros, due in particular to the increase in purchases in games and in applications. Games hardware revenue also increased, up 18% in total to around 3.6 billion euros. Demand for gaming consoles and gaming PC accessories was particularly strong.

About market data

Market data is based on statistics compiled by the GfK Consumer Panel and data.ai. The methods used by GfK to collect data on the German video game market are unique in terms of quality and global usage. They include an ongoing survey of 25,000 consumers representative of the entire German population regarding their buying and gaming habits, as well as a panel of retailers. The data collection methods provide a unique insight into the German computer and video games market.

game – the German Games Industry Association

We are the association of the German games industry. Our members include developers, publishers and many other gaming industry players such as esports event organizers, educational institutions and service providers. As co-organizer of gamescom, we are responsible for the world’s largest event dedicated to computer and video games. We are an expert partner of the media and political and social institutions, and answer questions relating to market development, gaming culture and media literacy. Our mission is to make Germany the best gaming location.

Mary I. Bruner