How much can you get paid for Superyacht jobs in Europe?

This is perhaps one of the most frequently asked questions at Flying Fish about Superyacht jobs in Europe!

We’ve mentioned it many times, but besides having the chance to travel the world and make amazing lifelong friends, the pay is perhaps one of the best things about working on a Superyacht.

In short, a superyacht deckhand or stewardess can expect to be paid between €2,000 and €3,500 per month (or £1,650.23 to £2,887.90 at the time of writing), although that in general it is around 2,500 €.

However, this is not always the case on every Superyacht, and your salary will generally depend on a variety of factors. Read on to find out more…

The amount you get paid as a flight attendant or deckhand depends on:

1. The yacht crew budget

Each yacht will be owned by a single owner or a management company. The manager will agree on a specific budget that the captain will use when hiring a crew.

Therefore, depending on this budget and the size and caliber of crew required to operate the Superyacht successfully, there may be small variations in your salary as a flight attendant or deckhand. bridge.

2. The size of the yacht you are working on

There are many different types and sizes of Superyacht, and this will ultimately affect how much you will be paid.

If you work on a 20m to 60m Superyacht, you can probably expect to receive the standard salary described above (€2,000 to €3,500 per month).

However, on a larger yacht (between 60m and 80m+), there will be a lot more work to do; for a deckhand, for example, more water sports toys to wash and bigger windows to clean, and for a stewardess, more guests to attend to.

This means that you can expect to receive a higher amount; specifically, around €3,000+.

3. Whether you work on a charter or private yacht.

In the world of superyachts, it is actually customary for charter guests to tip the crew! This tip is normally around 10% of the charter fee, so you can expect a reasonable increase in your salary at the end of the month.

However, private superyacht jobs in Europe do not guarantee such tips; so you’ll have to up your game and put in the extra effort in your day job for that extra bit of money!

4. Your level of experience

Naturally, more experienced Superyacht hostesses and deckhands will be paid more for their work than junior stewardesses and deckhands.

As an experienced air hostess or deckhand, you can expect to earn a salary of €2,800 to €3,000 (£2,310.32 to £2,475.34 at the time of writing), plus tips.

This will also increase and decrease depending on the size of the yacht; for example, an experienced hostess or deckhand will earn €3,500-€4,500+ (£2,887.90-£3,713.02) on a 60-80m Superyacht.

Superyachts on the water, representing Superyacht jobs in Europe.

There are also additional monetary benefits to working on a Superyacht…

Mainly, that your food and accommodation will all be included in your contract, as you will be living aboard the Superyacht.

Additionally, as Superyacht jobs in Europe mean it is very likely that you will be out of the UK for a significant period of time; you will therefore not have to pay income tax on this salary.

This means that all your hard-earned money can be spent on whatever you want; whether it’s exploring the parts of the world you visit on your days off or investing in additional Superyacht training to boost your salary and career even further!

One of the best ways to kick start your Superyacht salary is by taking a relevant Superyacht training course.

Indeed, although you can be hired for Superyacht jobs in Europe with no experience, the training will give you the additional knowledge, qualifications and practical skills you need to start earning more money faster.

It also means that you will be more likely to find work faster and therefore start earning sooner!

At Flying Fish, we run a dedicated Superyacht Deckhand and Superyacht Stewardess course for this very reason. Contact us to find out more and reserve your place on our next available course dates!




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Mary I. Bruner